SB1070 Racial profiling goes into effect in AZ, Presidential candidates visit Univision, Study on Latino Stereotypes, 9/17-9/24

26 Sep
Phoenix SB1070 Protest

Photo by: Ana Ramirez

Protests hit the streets as SB1070’s racial profiling provision moves forward

In Phoenix, AZ hundreds marched on Saturday in protest of the beginning of SB1070’s “show me your papers” provision. The injunction blocking this provision was recently lifted by a US District Court. The provision requires police to ask about legal status of people they stop and has many worried that it will lead to widespread racial profiling. Coverage on Democracy Now acknowledges the lengthy history of  “Brown Fear” and resistance in Arizona. Although the newly enacted state law will undoubtedly affect the civil liberties of Latinos in the state, it has also provoked a massive community organizing effort.

The protest in Phoenix is one of many across the country of undocumented activists who refuse to remain in the shadows and refuse to be silent. USA Today has taken note of the increasing boldness and fearless of young undocumented activists in particular. No longer content to wait for the executive and legislative branches to fulfill promises of comprehensive immigration reform, young people are fully committed to perhap the most prominent civil rights issues of our times.

Presidential Nominees appear on Univision

The Latino vote has been extensively examined in the lead up to the 2012 presidential election. This week, both candidates presented their cases for presidency at the University of Miami to Univision, the Latino media giant. A noticeably tan Romney spoke first on Wednesday when he continued to backpedal from the extremist remarks he made during the Republican primaries. His tone was softer than the Romney of a few months ago, who advocated for self-deportation, a federal Arizona style bill, and counted Kris Kobach (SB1070 architect) among his supporters. The audience was in his corner, as his campaign had orchestrated a favorable audience from Southern Florida when the networks realized that they would not be able to find enough interested college students.

Obama followed on Thursdays with a mea culpa saying that the immigration issue was his “biggest failure.” In the statement he said that he was not prepared for the flip-flopping of senator John McCain and the rest of those obstructionist Republicans.

Study about negative Latino stereotypes

A new study finds that stereotypes common in the media have an impact on public opinion of Latinos. The study by the National Hispanic Media Coalition looked at responses from participants when they heard about “undocumented” or “illegal” immigrants, and found that participants had colder feelings towards “illegal” immigrants. Further evidence of the importance of Colorlines’ Drop the I-word campaign to encourage journalists to stop referring to undocumented people as “illegal”. Also of interest, the study found that 30% of people think that the majority of Latinos are undocumented. There are 50 million Latinos in the United States, of which about 8.5 million are undocumented. Perhaps mistaken assumptions of the Latinos are behind Voter ID and anti-immigrant laws that have spread in the past few years.

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